Two for Holding

Lasai

Snow Pirates
2
Contemporary Romance
Defenseman. Devoted. Dad. Player on and off the ice, Russell Stewart’s life was upended when his girlfriend got pregnant and left him holding the baby. Two years later, he’s finally moved on, gotten back on track, and is balancing his life as a father, student, and hockey player like a professional juggler. His daughter Jude is his entire world. He has no time for distractions. Especially a funny, brilliant, and bubbly woman with a penchant for musicals. Regaining trust after heartbreak is hard. Can Russell protect his daughter, and his heart, when his past comes back to haunt him? If you’re pucking obsessed with Helena Hunting, Pippa Grant, and Elle Kennedy, you’ll love this steamy, swoony, single father sports romance. Two for Holding is a full length standalone with no cheating, cliffhangers, and a guaranteed happily ever after. Welcome to the Minnesota Snow Pirates, where skilled and sexy mother puckers’ lives get turned upside down by strong and badass heroines. Curl up with your next book boyfriend today.

This book contains:

  • Discussion of the impact of divorce
  • Emotional family violence
  • Single dad due to mother abandoning them.

Sabrina is from a traditional Indian family. As the youngest of five or six siblings (sorry, I can’t remember exactly how many there are), she’s constantly treated as the selfish one, the one that constantly disappoints the family. But all she’s ever done is help others, want to be heard and want to be able to make her own choices.

Russell is a single dad, has a double major at uni, plays college hockey and has dreams of making the NHL. He has a full plate as it is and is definitely not interested in romance after his daughters’ mother walked away and left them without any notice or a backwards glance.

We’re into the second book in the series of the Snow Pirates romances where we follow a different couple every book. In this one, we follow Sabrina and Russ for about three or four months as they figure out what they have and what it could potentially be.

I really enjoyed reading about how Sabrina and Russ, as young as they are, wove their way through some pretty hefty topics. At uni age, they worked their way through past emotional traumas and found their way to their happily ever after.

What I especially loved was how Lasairiona introduced domestic violence in a different way. So often, when someone talks about domestic violence, they’re talking about physical violence or overt control. But there are more forms than that.

The simple matter that Sabrina’s family (parents and all siblings) made her feel alone, selfish, and like her voice doesn’t matter. And when she raised this with them, their response was typical of domestic violence abusers.

It’s so good to see these impacts being openly talked about in such a real way.

It was so refreshing and I was desperately wanting the next book but of course I need to wait.

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