Instructional Design reading

So this is a new feature where I will be sharing my thoughts and takeaways from my own professional development. Now, since it’s not really a career many people know about I should probably give you a bit of background to what I actually do to make a living.

So first off, what I do is called Instructional Design. It’s often lumped under Human Resources but more specifically falls under Learning and Development, or Education or other similar names. The specific name depends on the business but we often refer to it s L&D.

Instructional design and brain physiology/psychology reference books

The next thing you should know is that various businesses consider Instructional Designers to have various skill sets. The base is always the same. But the additional skills aren’t always included and as such are sometimes separated into another role; Multi Media or Content Developers.

At the moment my skills are mostly at the base level, but I’m constantly working to improve those skills and branch out properly into being able to develop courses as well.

Ok, last thing I’m going to tell you is what I do on a day to day basis. Basically I design training programs. These could be those face to face lectures, workshops and activities you’ve probably all participated in at some point in time. But nowadays you also need to design online courses.

Since I’m pretty comfortable with my ability to design face to face facilitation but am still pretty new to designing elearns so I’m focusing my development there.

eLearning and instructional design text books

Since this includes reading about adult learning principles, psychology, technical planning and actual building tips and tricks I thought I could share these thoughts with you.

So as I’ve read enough of something to share some takeaways with you I will be doing so. Because I don’t have a set time to read these books I won’t have a schedule for these posts. If you find them interesting please make sure you follow me to get email notifications!